Single Tracks Blog Archive

MIT Sloan Management Review discusses "How the Analytics Gap Decides Who Wins"

It's not the data that's the problem.  It's the people.  So says a fascinating article in the winter 2011 issue of “MIT Sloan Management Review” (http://sloanreview.mit.edu/the-magazine/articles/2011/winter/52205/big-d...).  This extensive article written by several IBM researchers explores how organizations are utilizing analytics to differentiate themselves from their competitors and to become top performers in their industries.  The article profiles results of a massive survey of more than 3000 business executives in mu

The EMR to end all EMRs

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Check out this website: http://www.extormity.com/index.php/extormity-knows-best for a parady of electronic health records systems that create such complexity in a medical practice that they crowd out the actual practice of medicine.  The site was developed by the maker of manual records systems, so it's obviously not unbiased, but it probably shares the sentiments of many organizations that have attempted to implement EMR systems.

"Population Health" provides guidance for ACOs and others taking health risk

"Population Health -Creating a Culture of Wellness"  (http://www.amazon.com/Population-Health-Creating-Culture-Wellness/dp/076378043X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1298394113&sr=8-1)  is a new book that provides a comprehensive overview of the issues involved in understanding and managing the health of large groups of people.  Coauthored by David Nash, Dean of Thomas Jefferson University's School of Population Health, the book is separated into section

Focusing Care on the Highest Cost Patients

Atul Gawande, the author of "The Checklist Manifesto" and "Better", has an interesting article in the January 24 issue of The New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/01/24/110124fa_fact_gawande) on efforts to target healthcare services to the small number of patients who consume the greatest amount of healthcare resources.  These patients, often having multiple chronic diseases, often slip through the cracks of the conventional healthcare system and end up usi

Your Industrial-Strength Database - And It's Free!

Let's suppose you've been tasked with a project that requires dealing with a significant amount of data.  Perhaps you're analyzing changes in the demographics of patients using hospital services over the last three years, analyzing the results of your cost accounting system, or investigating various characteristics of bad debt claims.  All of these would require working with large volumes of data that would tax the abilities of most spreadsheets.  In your heart you know that you need a true database system to handle this data, but know that there is no way th

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